Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Running FAQs 2011

I recruited two! fresh maggots just yesterday (don’t let me down, J and S, and to S in particular: SLOW DOWN), and that and Kylie and procrastination have inspired me to open the floor for your running questions. I’ll take them from the comments and put them up here. Ask away.

Q: I’ve been running the same 5k distance for several years now, about 3 times a week. It takes me 30 minutes. I have recently started adding some weight training on non-running days, which is (I think) helping the running. I’m going a little faster, I think, or feeling a bit stronger when I run, at least. So my question is, what should I do to break out of the same plodding 5k rut? Add distance or try picking up the pace? Or a mixture?

A: I think you mean add time, not distance. Picking up the pace and adding time both will add distance. A mixture, but only one thing at a time. You can add about 10 percent to either per week if you have a good solid base (i.e., months of steady running, not weeks.) I recommend focusing on extending your running time first. More about this here.
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Q: S here! Today was Day 2 of Camp Cut-It-Up, in which I transform from a squishy, weak maggot to a shiny, fast, hard-shelled house fly. Today I went more slowly than yesterday, only “running“ half a block at a time, then walking for a few minutes so I wouldn’t die. My question: why do I have to spit every couple blocks, and where the f- is all this saliva/phlegm coming from? My other question: my lower back hurts. Am I running wrong?

A: Dammit, S, I just KNEW you were going to be trouble. Yes, you're running wrong. #1: you are trying to run every day, violating Rule 3, run every OTHER day; #2, you are going too fast, which I know because your salivary glands are rebelling. That happens when you overexert. Parasympathetic/sympathetic balance, mumble mumble. As for your back, you need to strengthen your abdominal muscles. Do that on the days you're not running, and while you're running, suck it in.
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Q: I get migraines after running. It happens more often in warm weather. I would really like to increase the amount of exercise I do but the headaches are so frustrating! Especially since I feel fine while running. Going longer than 25 minutes pretty much guarantees the migraine. I have a prescription that works but I don't want to have to take it every time I work out.

A: Exercise-induced migraines are thought to be related to two things: water/electrolyte balance, and that during exercise, your blood vessels expand, and when you stop, they contract, and blood vessel expansion and constriction in the brain are what goes on during a migraine. Try these four things: 1) start your run especially slowly, so as to ease your blood vessels into the activity; 2) drink a sports drink BEFORE you run (generally not useful, but for this it may be) and DON’T drink a lot of water immediately after; 3) take or drink some caffeine before you run; and 4) take a good solid dose of ibuprofen or naproxen at least half an hour before you run. Eventually you may find that the exercise gets your cerebral vessels into shape and decreases the headaches. (It’s ok to use your migraine meds up to twice a week, but yeah, sucks to have to do it every time.)
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Q: My heart rate stays high after a run (130) and then drops to 90 in one beat. Massaging my neck fixes it so I do this immediately after my run. I figure better to be fit with an arrhythmia than be unfit. Is that a good attitude or should I stop and see “someone”? Last doctor I mentioned it to just said “stop running.”

A: Whoa. MAJOR issue here. Not the high heart rate itself, but that it sounds like you have an SVT (supraventricular arrhythmia) that resolves with carotid massage, a “vagal maneuver.” Can be a very minor thing, but this is something you DO need to see a cardiologist about. Just stopping running is definitely not the answer, since you could have this with any exertion, and if it’s a dangerous arrhythmia, you need to find that out.
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Q: I so long to be a maggot! I started out fit, but after a 7 year hiatus I am fighting my way back at 47. What’s a good strategy for managing your heart rate? I run with a heart rate monitor so I can avoid overdoing it, but 60 seconds into what I perceive to be a very slow run my heart rate kicks it up to the high 160’s. So I drop back to a fast walk until I hit 130 and then run for 30 seconds … and then, bing — 160’s again. Maybe I need a freshly laid fly egg program before I graduate to maggothood!

A: Ditch the heart rate monitor. There is no point in “managing” your heart rate. As in the answer above, it’s not the number that matters but the way you feel. If you are breathless, you are running too fast, whatever your heart rate or your speed. As you SLOWLY get back into shape, your heart rate is likely to drift down, but who cares? It’s like measuring your speed, which maggots are not allowed to do until they’ve been running a good long time. (And you ARE a maggot!)
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Q: I have a sore spot on the back of my hip where the muscle attaches to my ilia. I noticed it while walking to work a few weeks ago. I started my running program this week, and because of the sore spot, have just walked instead. It’s still not better! Must I lay off it altogether or just keep walking or what? Should I stretch it? Ice it? Take a nap and have another beer? New Maggot J

A: General rule: if it was not caused by running you can run through it, provided that it does not hurt MORE while running. In fact, sounds like yours was caused by walking, so even more reason to run instead. You will probably find that it will hurt at first, then as you get into your run will ease off, then it will be sore after. That’s ok. There are many, many weird little muscle pains that happen, and you will not permanently damage anything by running through them, and they make take weeks to go away. As for stretching/icing/etc., there’s no very good evidence to suggest that these make a real difference, but if it makes you feel better, go ahead. And, why not have all three? Run, then beer, then nap.
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Q: I have plantar fasciitis / heel pain, and I can run through it but it’s just no fun. What’s the best approach: keep running on the theory that it will hurt anyway, or take time off?

A: Plantar fasciitis is a bitch, but it does not have to derail your running life, no matter what your doctor says. I don’t have instant cures, but I do have useful knowledge. 1) You do not have to stop running completely, though softer surfaces, less distance, and no hills are not a bad idea. 2) Stretching and foot exercises do help. 3) It almost always lasts for a long, long time (months) no matter what you do, but it WILL go away. 4) I advise staying away from injections, because the complications from them outweigh the benefit (if any) for most people. 5) NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen) help. 6) Cushioning/orthotics can help. Wikipedia has a pretty good page on it.
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Q: I am running every day and I have injured myself. What to do?
A: This isn’t an actual question, but it lies beneath several of them. If you write to me that you are having problems of some kind and you are running every day (or even just two days in a row), I want to slap you upside your head, because you have disobeyed instructions and I cannot help you now. Run every OTHER day. It works, people. Exercise causes tiny tears within muscle, and the repair thereof is how you get into shape. It takes approximately 2 days for this cycle to complete, so if you run too soon, you just tear and tear and then you’re hurt and then you’re a Maggot down. (I’m cyber-slapping S, Feral, Scr, and a few others – you know who you are.)
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Q: Do you eat before you run? I worry about being lightheaded if I don’t eat or cramps if I do. And can I drink coffee before a run?
A: Eating is tricky, because each person is different. I have an iron stomach, so I can eat a small meal and run half an hour later. Others need a couple of hours to avoid nausea. The other tricky part about eating is what to eat. I cannot have simple sugars at all the days that I run; unless I have a reasonable amount of protein and fat in my system I “bonk,” even on a short run. I can’t be hungry either, for the same reason. You’ll have to learn what you need via trial and error (though avoid simple sugars for sure; they’re not good for you anyway). And you don’t want to eat anything you don’t mind resampling via eructation the duration of your run. Caffeine: yes! It is a potent performance enhancer (a good thing!) and its dehydration danger rep is a myth. (You may need to find a bathroom along the way—it can make you have to pee.) As for when, whenever feels good. On morning runs, I slug coffee just before going out the door, but again, iron stomach.
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Q: You’ve written about running not being much of a risk factor for arthritis, but I’m a little worried about it. Last summer I was determined to get my 5K time below 30 minutes, but I noticed that my hips started aching between runs. One day I just walked briskly. The result was the worst hip pain ever. Also, is it true that people with benign ligamentous laxity have a harder time running? I would feel better about my poky pace if I could blame it on my loosely knit joints.
A: I stick by my statements re: running and arthritis. And listen to yourself: your hips started to hurt after you tried to force yourself to go faster, AND they hurt more when you WALKED. You are running proof of the excellence of my advice. As for laxity, I don’t think there is good data, but I noticed a while ago that we avid runners tend to be a stiff lot even before we start. Perhaps having tight connective tissue IS protective against injury. (Bad for childbearing, but I only had to do that once and I run every other day.)
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Q: Any advice on running with a dog or a fetus?
A: If anyone has good advice, put it in the comments below, would you? I don’t have much experience with either. I couldn’t run pregnant for a variety of reasons, but I know of many who have. It’s not dangerous if you’re healthy. (Oh and: some veterinarians will tell you that your dog shouldn’t run far. This is silly if you have a healthy dog.)

(Note: I will try to answer at least a question a day, and I’ll try to answer all of them eventually, but not in order. Some are really hard!)

41 comments:

Stephanie said...

I've been running the same 5k distance for several years now, about 3 times a week. It takes me 30 minutes. I have recently started adding some weight training on non-running days, which is (I think) helping the running. I'm going a little faster, I think, or feeling a bit stronger when I run, at least. So my question is, what should I do to break out of the same plodding 5k rut? Add distance or try picking up the pace? Or a mixture?

Mary_Flashlight said...

Hey DoctorMama - just wanted to let you know that someone you gave a pass to from running has now started to run! A few years ago, you said that anyone could run... and when I emailed you directly regarding nursing every 2 hours day and night, being a 42J-cup, and working full time, you said I could actually be an exception.

I started by losing 110 lbs (overall) through diet and while I still have about 30 lbs to go, my body seems to be happy at this weight. (It helps that I'm down to a 34DDD now and can find a sports bra, albeit still in a specialty store!) I made a pledge to myself that I would run the Autism Ribbon Run 5K in October here.

I'm doing a run/walk combo right now and am up to 3 miles every other day. I had been having knee issues and have been told by both my chiropractor and my physical therapist (for a different issue) that the problem is actually my quads being tight. They gave me some stretches, but I don't feel like it's doing enough.

Suggestions? and thanks for talking about running slow. I wish someone had told me when I was 16 that you could WALK during a run. I might have run further than a mile...

Ruth said...

I run for about 25 minutes 3 times a week -- I think the distance is about 2.2 miles. I go slower in warm weather and a little faster in cool. I've been doing this routinely for about 2 years. Sometimes (pretty often) I get migraines 4-6 hours after running. It happens more often in warm weather. I would really like to increase the amount of exercise I do but the headaches are so frustrating! Especially since I feel fine while running... Going longer than 25 minutes pretty much guarantees the migraine. Any advice to avoid the headaches? I have thought about adding another day or two of gentle exercise -- maybe walking? I have a prescription (maxalt) that works but I don't want to have to take it every time I work out.

Thanks!

Rose @ Eat, Drink, and Be Meiri said...

I'm thinking about doing a few months of crossfit and yoga this summer, which means I need to adjust my schedule. If I only run once a week, but run like 6-10 miles every week, will I be able to maintain my running endurance?

Also, do you have any tips for running with a dog?

Anonymous said...

S here! Today was Day 2 of Camp Cut-It-Up, in which I transform from a squishy, weak maggot to a shiny, fast, hard-shelled house fly. Of sorts.

Today I went more slowly than yesterday, only "running" half a block at a time, then walking for a few minutes so I wouldn't die. It was just important that I got outside and moved my ass.

My question is this: why do I have to spit every couple blocks, and where the f- is all this saliva/phlegm coming from? Does this happen to other people?

My other question: my lower back hurts. Am I running wrong?

Also, you have a 3rd new maggot; my boyfriend B recently started running too, and burned through your entire archive of maggotry in one sitting.

Denise said...

So glad you are soliciting questions! I have two. One is about plantar fasciitis. I have it (left foot), and I can run through it but it's just no fun. What's the best approach: keep running on the theory that it will hurt anyway, or take time off?

The kicker is that I changed my gait in a last-ditch effort to shake off another injury, which was just this weird groin pain (right side) where the whole area would just seize up to the point where I could barely walk. I switched from a hard heel strike to a more moderate midfoot strike, and I think that (plus experimenting with some minimalist shoes) has caused the plantar fasciitis in the left foot.

Also, as I get older, I'm actually much better at running distances, but after a few weeks I start to "seize up" - just horrible muscle stiffness to the point where it's no fun to run. Is this just old age, or is there something I can do about it? I had a few episodes of low calcium after my recent neck dissection and think my parathyroids were damaged. The twitching in the mouth area and severe muscle cramps have resolved but I wonder if it could still be affecting me in the form of tendency toward muscle stiffness.

Wow, these are more like medical advice questions than running questions! But no matter which specialist I ask, they always say, "That's really not my area."

Denise said...

Also, @ Ruth - I am not a doctor but have gotten those kinds of migraines after running. In my case they seem to be dehydration headaches. A lot of water and a lot of ibuprofen cures them, and it seems to prevent them, too.

Bones said...

My heart rate stays high after a run (130) and then drops to 90 in one beat. It can take 20 minutes or more for this to happen. I have found that massaging my neck fixes it so do this immediately after my run. I figure better to be fit with an arrhythmia than be unfit. Is that a good attitude or should I stop and see "someone". Last doctor I mentioned it to just said "stop running".

Anonymous said...

Dear Dr. Mama,
I am a maggot that you recruited into running. I broke metatarsal #5 (a longitudinal split along the shaft) on June 1. I go back for a new x-ray on June 28th. My question is this: once the bone is fully healed, would it be okay to go back to running fairly quickly, or should I wait some additional length of time? [Note - I did not break the bone while running. I broke it leaping up to push a blanket onto a high closet shelf and came down on a 1.5 inch wooden lip at the base of the closet]
Thanks,
LD

Jennifer said...

Dr. Mama,
I have a sore spot on the back of my hip where the muscle attaches to my ilia. I noticed it while walking to work a few weeks ago. I started my running program this week, and because of the sore spot, have just walked instead. It's still not better! Must I lay off it altogether or just keep walking or what? Should I stretch it? Ice it? Take a nap and have another beer?
New Maggot,
J

Anonymous said...

Any tips for pregnant maggots? I started running several months before I got pregnant and now run about 3 miles three times a week. I'm in my 16th week and usually feel great except for the breathing. Sometimes, it seems so hard to catch my breath. Any advice regarding this or generally? Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Thanks for opening up the Q&A! I so long to be a maggot! I started out fit, but after a 7 year conception and kid induced cold turkey hiatus I am fighting my way back. At 47, it's not getting any easier. I have a couple of questions--first, a follow up on back pain. My whole back and neck seriously ache days after I run, not just my lower back. And two, what's a good strategy for managing your heart rate? I run with a heartrate monitor so I can avoid over doing it since in my head I am still a fairly fit 40 (or 20) year old. I warm up by fast walking, but find that 60 seconds into what I percieve to be a very slow run my heartrate kicks it up to the high 160's. So I drop back to a fast walk until I hit 130 and then run for 30 seconds....and then, bing--160's again. Maybe I need a freshly laid fly egg program before I graduate to maggothood! Thanks! Mellie

Anonymous said...

I want ro run in the morning, but i worry about being light headed if i did not eat or cramps if I do. Do you eat before you run?
Prospective maggot,
RocketGrl

Jamie said...

You've written in the past about running not being much of a risk factor for arthritis, but I'm a little worried about it. My paternal grandmother had both hips replaced in her early 60s. My mother developed arthritis in her 30s. Last summer I was determined to get my 5K time below 30 minutes before I turned 40, but I noticed that my hips started aching between runs.

I think part of the problem is stride length: if I try to move faster by lengthening my stride, I'll have hip pain the next day. One day in the spring I forgot my sports bra and so I decided just to walk briskly on the treadmill -- a 13:30 minute per mile pace. The result was the worst hip pain ever, and I've been gun-shy about running ever since.

If I stick with my pitiful 11-12 minute mile jogging pace, I don't have hip pain. I guess I'm wondering if family history and complaining hip joints might suggest that I shouldn't be running at all. :-(

Jamie said...

And can I ask another? Is it true that people with benign ligamentous laxity have a harder time running briskly? (I think I read it in Brain, Child or some other non-authoritative source.) I would feel better about my poky pace if I could blame it on my loosely knit joints. :-)

Anonymous said...

MAGGOT DOWN!

S checking in. I think I broke or sprained my foot while running. The top of the foot in the middle is a little bruised and swollen, and something in the middle is creaking when I move it. And it hurts when I walk on it.

Just an update. And right when I'd gotten a great running playlist together. So I'm working on strengthening my abs for when I can run again.

-S

bobbi said...

Hey DoctorMama - maggot checking in. No questions for you today, but I thought I'd let you know that I just finished marathon number 2 Saturday. Keep up the good work!

Anonymous said...

A little over 3 months ago you inspired me to run. You turned me from couch potato to red faced running tomato. I never imagined that I would love running. I run 3or 4 times a week, 3 to 5 miles each run. I'm getting faster too.
Thank you.

Urol resident

Georgia said...

Heya,

Long time lurker, first time poster. You converted me to running ages ago and this year I've been going really well. 10% increase in time a week and I'm up to 14.3 km but have hit foot pain again!

Anyway I had some pseudo advice for two of the questions.

Re running with a dog: - When I lived in town I used a stretchy lead and attached it to my bum-bag (fanny pack??). Something around my waist! As long as the lead was long enough the dog doesn't get tangled under my feet and I have control without having the straining arms. He's now built his running up with me and runs the long runs.

For the plantar fasciitis my podiatrist has had me doing 5x 1min calf stretches per leg and a 2x 1 min ham string stretches (two types)every day and until last week I haven't had any trouble. Might be worth a go?

Kylie said...

Thank you, thank you Dr Mama! I love the enthusiasm for all things maggotty generated here when runnning's on the agenda. I'm wondering when age per se needs to be factored into a running schedule. I'm almost 43 and run with a small group of women in my neighbourhood who are in their 30s. We run three times a week for a total of about 35kms. We've done a couple of half-marathons. (Incidentally, I was only running about 8kms per week 5 years ago - you were largely responsible for motivating me to do more. Thanks for that!) Right now the age difference has no impact - we're all roughly in the same shape and I don't seem any older. But, some of these gals are 8 years younger than me and I feel like at some stage my advanced age will do me in. However, I don't want to let myself 'give in' to this fear and use it as an excuse to slacken off if it's not valid. I appreciate there's probably not a one-size-fits-all answer to this question, injury can strike at any age etc but should I be realistically expecting that at some stage (menopause?) age will make a difference? Obviously I appreciate that keeping yourself in the best shape possible is the best way to lessen the impact of ageing, but I do want to be realistic about expectations.

Thanks again for inviting these questions.
Kylie

Anonymous said...

I'd like to know what the first steps to move from 5 to 10K are? At the moment I do 5K in 25 mins (I'm 45, and started out as a maggot last spring, after reading your blog). I'm done in at the finish line of my timed weekly run and can't imagine going any further. The rest of the week I go to a spin, yoga and aerobics class and sometimes fit in a run as well, but never more than this distance I appear to have got stuck at...

Thanks, Fiona

Anonymous said...

I frequently refer to your running advice as the best running advice I ever received. This past year I moved from 5k to 10k and just as I was working on adding mileage for a 10 mile, I seem to have injured myself. I think a variety of factors are at work - I added mileage and speed at the same time. Also, I have new shoes. At any rate, my achilles tendons hurt and on my right foot my heel is extremely painful. I'm about to see a doctor for advice but do you have any advice about the injury or how to get the most out of my appointment?

-Stacey

Anonymous said...

Another one - to have a coffee before a run or not? I've read conflicting reports. If yes, how long before would you recommend?

Fiona

Julie R said...

I have problems with exercise induced migraines, too. I found that taking magnesium/calcium and B-complex supplements has practically eliminated the problem.

Drinking lots of extra water (like 3x my normal amount) helps too, but I don't think it's just extra water by itself.

Emily said...

Thank you, thank you, thank you DoctorMama! I waited anxiously for your response to the question about headaches following a run. I was so happy to see that you didn't simply answer that it's a dehydration issue. That's the only answer I've ever found, so I was hydrating like crazy before and after a run. For the past few runs I've taken it easy with the water post-run instead of guzzling it like I did before. I make sure I rehydrate throughout the rest of the day, and I've had no headache issues since. Often my day would be ruined with a headache, but not running wasn't an option. THANK YOU!

Scr said...

Shin splints suck. I have read your previous post on this...My gait/distance/time hasnt changed. Not running hills. Did get new shoes. ran 2.5 mi one day after a week off to try the new shoes and ok. next day tried to go a mile and I could feel them coming back. Wtf can I do? Ive stretched, but maybe not enough? Never prone to this before ever. How long should I lay off?

Ruth said...

Just checking back on the migraines -- following your suggestions I have had 3 headache free running days now. Hoping for #4 today. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the coffee advice - I will need to start a brew before I leave the house on a Sat morning now.

Another, maybe strange one...maybe about 10 mins into my run (5K) I start to not feel my legs...they're not numb really, just like I have less feeling in them. What could that be?

It's a nice evening here in Edinburgh, and I have signed up for a 5K around the Botanic Garden - I'm usually a morning jogger, so will see how that goes.

Cheers, Fiona

Heather said...

My dog almost always runs with me. Advice for running with a dog? 1) Start slow, just as for humans, if your dog hasn't been running before. 2) Be careful the heat, and keep a close eye on your dog if it's warm. I'm comfortable running at higher temps than my dog is. 3) I just use a hand-held leash, but I switch hands a few times during the run to try to even my body out. 4) Check the pads on your dogs feet for abrasions, and watch its movements at home for any sign of soreness. My dog also goes mountain biking with me and he would keep running even if exhausted or injured, so I need to act as his common sense to keep him well. 5) Carry 2 poop bags with you, because running seems to make dogs need to go more often.

Anonymous said...

I have heard that it's not good for young dogs (maybe before the age of one) to run b/c their bones and joints are still forming.

Ozzie said...

Young dogs running a LOT is not so great, running with doggie saddlebags is not good until they're about a year and a half or older (if the dogs are large breeds).

For running with any dog- I recommend a Halti or Gentle Leader (head harness). It keeps them from pulling too much and after a few uses, keeps them calmer. Watch out for neighbors who think it's cool to let their dogs run loose!

And, for the record, I am a maggot who runs with 2 70-lb dogs, 2-5 miles depending on the day. The dogs and I are both better off for it.

Ozzie said...

Also, if you've got younger dogs, running a little is awesome. Keep it to interval running or 1-2 miles for the first few months, then work your way up if you're going longer. You might have to break it up into a morning and evening run to let them build up to it. Watch their feet!

Lioness said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lioness said...

No time to read the comments so apologies if this has been said before but as a vet I needed to add this: with obesity being such a serious and ever-growing disease I'm a big supporter of pets being properly exercised. Much like people, animals need to be eased into it. A dog that is exercised properly daily can be run for quite a long time. A dog that is sedentary and is suddenly made to run for a long time can develop exertional rahbdomyolysis. Paws should always be checked to insure they haven't been injured, and a dog shouldn't be exercised heavily if it's very hot outside - risk of heat stroke and pad injuries. Don't trust the dog to let you know they're hurting, a lot have so much fun running they'll endure pain and cause actual harm.
My first attempt at maggotising myself didn't work very well, am now moving houses and looking forward to creating good habits from the start - and dog will run with me! It confuses her so, bless her...

scissorbill said...

You turned me into a runner! I've been at it a year, completed a half marathon in Oct, another in June and I'm running a full in Oct. Thank you! None of my real doctors dared tell me to get off my ass so I'm glad you did :)

Bridgett said...

I just wanted to say that in the past, when I've tried to take up running, all the super buff, super fast veteran runners intimidate me so much I can hardly finish my run. But now, whenever I pass one of those runners at my slower-than-an-arthritic-sloth pace, I imagine it's you, DoctorMama, and you're thinking, "Go Maggot, go!" So thanks for that!

EAI said...

Dr. Momma - I am new maggot J's running buddy. I have a pain question.

My ankle has been bugging me. It hurts after a run, but not during. It's a bit stiff and maybe slightly puffy but not at all bruised or sprained looking. It's both ankles, but mostly the right. Under the ankle bone and just behind it.

I was doing some jump-heavy exercise videos in bare feet in addition to the new running routine, as I don't have cross trainers. Not sure if that was the problem or the running.

The question - do I keep running unless it actually seems to make it worse or do I take a break? As we've JUST started and I care more about keeping the routine more than anything else, I hate to quit now.

Old MD Girl said...

I was told never to use a gentle leader/halti while running, but the easy-walk harness is ok. I've had some luck with a puppia harness, but lately it's just been too hot for the dog to run. It may take a little while for the dog to get used to running by your side, but if my dog can do it, any active breed can.

Jen G. said...

Hello!
I have been running since I was about 12 years old. I am now 31. I am training for my first marathon. Before I decided to run a marathon I would typically run 3-5 miles 1-4 times a week. I have found that no matter how much fluid replacement I do (cytomax or gaterade) while I am running, and recovery drinks/bars after my run, I feel quite sick (nauseous) any time I run over 10 miles. I start feeling sick about 30 minutes after my run and it could last the rest of the day. Do you have any suggestions?

Also, Do you have any suggestions for tendonitis in the ankles? Last year I tried to train for the same marathon and got advanced tendonitis in both of my ankles. It started out as uncomfortable and progressed to the point where I couldn't walk and my ankles were swollen and I had zero range of motion. I tried running through the pain, and that's how it got so bad. I was forced to stop training 4 weeks before the marathon. I did physical therapy for four months and got orthodics for my shoes. I do much more stretching now as well. My ankles still hurt a bit. I recently went back to the orthopedic doctor. He said I am cleared to train for the marathon, but to come back if the tendonitis flares up. Any suggestions?

Thank you so much for any advice. I love reading your blog!

Jen G.

Bones said...

Hi Dr Mama,
Thanks for making me go to the cardiologist to see why my heart was doing odd things after exercise. I had an echo, a treadmill test and a monitor and it turns out I have PAT. The good news is I can continue running but good to know what it is. I am having fast rates without realising it and only notice when it's there for a while.
Thanks for getting me to see someone as I'd been putting it off.

C said...

I would love a Maggot T-shirt, do you still have those around somewhere?

I got hacked but I blog sometimes on a blog talking about running in recovery from addictions.